THE DAY WHEN SMEDERAVO BECAME SERBIA’S HIROSHIMA

SMEDERAVO BECAME 1

SMEDERAVO BECAME

SMEDEREVO This week marks the 75th anniversary of June 5, the date when the Smederevo remembered as the greatest disaster in the history of which it is struck.

At exactly 14 hours and 14 minutes in the air flew a German ammunition dump in the Fortress. The neighboring railway station was full of people, which was a Thursday, market day, the seniors came after graduation, he found himself here, and the ensemble of the Serbian National Theatre in Novi Sad, which was the day before appeared in Smederevo. The total number of victims has never been precisely determined, there are estimates that killed about 4,000 people. What is certain is that the list of killed about 2,500 of Smederevo by name, but it is not known how many people from other cities that day either in or traveled by rail.

About the cause of the explosion 400 wagons of ammunition, which is estimated to have been in the fortress, there are several theories, none were ever confirmed, by accident, because of the heat of the day, the English planes flying over, to communist diversions.

The explosion destroyed the entire city, destroyed public and private houses, every other resident of Smederevo, writing in chronicles, was injured or wounded. Tremors felt in Velika Plana, the White Church, Vrsac and Belgrade! Since 2393 the house, as there were in the former Smederevo, only 25 remained intact, and it is not surprising that many this tragedy called “Serbian Hiroshima”.

Smederevo on this date, which was originally called the “Ark of the day,” the idea of the then Commissioner for the reconstruction of the city Ljotić, pays tribute to the victims. It seems this memorial service at the crypt in the old cemetery, then, traditionally, locomotive whistle and bells of the temple of Saint George in 14:14, but then, after a minute of silence, the monument to the victims on June 5 were laid wreaths and flowers.
By William Dorich

Filed Under: FeaturedHistory - Past to Future

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